Design Action Studio for Research, Architecture, and Urbanism
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Mumbai:Shift

Mumbai:Shift Mumbai, India / 2010 with Travis Bunt, Manas Vanwari, and Nidhi Bhatnagar Mumbai:SHIFT uses Mumbai’s privately owned and underused Eastern Waterfront as the site for a paradigmatic SHIFT of current unsustainable development practices. The project targets three concerns: 1) a lack of East-West urban transit connections triggered by inequalities in urban development that favor north-south expansion, 2) a lack of public open space and, 3) the projected population growth [from 19 million in 2005 to 28 million by 2020] on Mumbai’s already saturated and dilapidated urban/social fabric. These concerns intertwine at multiple scales to provide opportunities for new models of dynamic urban development that leverage existing policies [specifically, the transfer of development rights] toward both social and market inclusion. The process is set in motion by the strategic implementation of bus rapid transit systems that draw east-west connections between major transportation nodes—weaving the island city laterally and raising property values along both the new transit spines and the eastern waterfront. This creates opportunities to rezone [with higher FAR] and develop urban land. Any new development would be contingent upon a linkage policy that binds new developable Eastern Waterfront properties [new TDR receiver sites] to specific inner city parcels of land containing dilapidated buildings [new TDR sending sites]. Thus concurrent with new development is both the opportunity and incentive to reprogram dilapidated sites [approx. 16,000 sites] for public uses. The Eastern Waterfront acquires both social and market value.

Mumbai:Shift

Mumbai, India / 2010
with Travis Bunt, Manas Vanwari, and Nidhi Bhatnagar

Mumbai:SHIFT uses Mumbai’s privately owned and underused Eastern Waterfront as the site for a paradigmatic SHIFT of current unsustainable development practices. The project targets three concerns: 1) a lack of East-West urban transit connections triggered by inequalities in urban development that favor north-south expansion, 2) a lack of public open space and, 3) the projected population growth [from 19 million in 2005 to 28 million by 2020] on Mumbai’s already saturated and dilapidated urban/social fabric. These concerns intertwine at multiple scales to provide opportunities for new models of dynamic urban development that leverage existing policies [specifically, the transfer of development rights] toward both social and market inclusion.

The process is set in motion by the strategic implementation of bus rapid transit systems that draw east-west connections between major transportation nodes—weaving the island city laterally and raising property values along both the new transit spines and the eastern waterfront. This creates opportunities to rezone [with higher FAR] and develop urban land. Any new development would be contingent upon a linkage policy that binds new developable Eastern Waterfront properties [new TDR receiver sites] to specific inner city parcels of land containing dilapidated buildings [new TDR sending sites]. Thus concurrent with new development is both the opportunity and incentive to reprogram dilapidated sites [approx. 16,000 sites] for public uses. The Eastern Waterfront acquires both social and market value.

 
Intertwining Concerns: Dilapidation

Intertwining Concerns: Dilapidation

Intertwining Concerns: Current Population.

Intertwining Concerns: Current Population.

Intertwining Concerns: Rapid Urbanization.

Intertwining Concerns: Rapid Urbanization.

Intertwining Concerns: Rapid Urbanization.

Intertwining Concerns: Rapid Urbanization.

Intertwining Concerns: Poor Transportation Network.

Intertwining Concerns: Poor Transportation Network.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Density to Open Space

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Density to Open Space

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Property Values

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Property Values

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Informatic Urban Cross Section: Urban Program to Density to Property Values.

Existing Bus and Train Network (left) / Proposed East/West RBT System (right).

Existing Bus and Train Network (left) / Proposed East/West RBT System (right).

TDR Transfer Strategy.

TDR Transfer Strategy.

TDR Transfer Strategy. As transit connections physically link the Eastern Waterfront with the inner city, a development linkage policy links them financially and programmatically, triggering a development ecology that is both social and market-driven.

TDR Transfer Strategy. As transit connections physically link the Eastern Waterfront with the inner city, a development linkage policy links them financially and programmatically, triggering a development ecology that is both social and market-driven.

Dynamic Development Scenario along Proposed Transportation Corridors.

Dynamic Development Scenario along Proposed Transportation Corridors.

Dynamic Development Scenario along Proposed Transportation Corridors.

Dynamic Development Scenario along Proposed Transportation Corridors.

Mixed-Use Development Scenario.

Mixed-Use Development Scenario.